Today’s episode is about dyspraxia, a developmental disorder which is most often associated with challenges related to motor coordination but is also often marked by disorganization, clumsiness and poor short-term memory. My guest, Victoria Biggs, knows first-hand what it’s like to grow up with dyspraxia. When she was sixteen years old, she actually wrote a book to help teens like her get through adolescence called Caged in Chaos: A Dyspraxic Guide to Breaking Free

Vicky is a university research fellow and lecturer, a teacher in a school for children with trauma-related mental health problems, a writer, and a story. In addition to having dyspraxia, Vicky is also autistic. In our conversation today, Vicky talks us through her own story of growing up with dyspraxia and shares her personal insights on how parents and teachers can better support dyspraxic children.  

 

About Victoria: My name is Victoria Biggs. I usually go by Vicky. I’m a university research fellow and lecturer, a teacher in a school for children with trauma-related mental health problems, a writer, a storyteller, and the property of a cat named Lottie. I’m also autistic and dyspraxic.

When I was sixteen years old, I wrote a book called Caged in Chaos: A Dyspraxic Guide to Breaking Free, a light-hearted guerrilla guide to adolescence and everything it throws at you. Since it came out I’ve been a regular guest speaker and trainer on autistic spectrum disorders, dyspraxia, and other specific learning difficulties (SpLD). Whoever you are – a parent of a struggling child, a teacher wondering how to support the SpLD students in your class, or a person with SpLD yourself – I hope you will find something useful and encouraging on my site. Learn more here. 

 

THINGS YOU’LL LEARN FROM THIS EPISODE:

  • What dyspraxia is
  • The primary challenges children and teens with dyspraxia face while growing up
  • Practical tips for supporting teens with dyspraxia
  • What Victoria believes schools and society can do better to support kids with learning differences
  • How Victoria’s experience with dyspraxia has influenced her as a special education teacher
  • The most important considerations for parents of newly diagnosed dyspraxic children

 

RESOURCES MENTIONED:

 

 

 

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