In this episode of the podcast, I’m talking with Dr. Michael Postma, a writer, consultant and presenter specializing in the education and well-being of twice exceptional (Aspergers, ADD, Dyslexia, etc) and intellectually gifted students and their families. Dr. Postma is also the Executive Director of SENG, which stands for Supporting the Emotional Needs of the Gifted, an organization whose mission it is to empower families and communities to guide gifted and talented individuals to reach their goals: intellectually, physically, emotionally, socially, and spiritually, as well as the author of the new book, The Inconvenient Student: Critical Issues in the Identification and Education of Twice-Exceptional Students.

Dr. Postma and I had a honest and personal conversation about the many challenges facing gifted and twice-exceptional students, especially social and emotional challenges, and this is one of those episodes that just might leave you feeling pensive, concerned, and ignited all at the same time. If you are raising a gifted or 2e kid, I encourage you to check out all the resources and places for further information that Dr. Postma shares, especially those related to SENG.

 

>>Click here to watch my After the Show video about this episode!<<

 

About Michael: Dr. Michael Postma is a consultant, speaker, and author dedicated to the holistic development of both gifted and twice-exceptional children through his company Agility Educational Solutions. Over the last two decades, Dr. Postma has worked in the field of gifted/talented education as both a teacher and administrator in the public school system and was the architect of the Minnetonka Navigator Program (MN), a magnet school for highly and profoundly gifted students. He was also the Executive Director at Metrolina Regional Scholars Academy, a charter school for gifted children in Charlotte, NC. Dr. Postma has multiple degrees. He obtained a B.A. in History from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, a M.A. in Gifted and Talented Education, and, a Ed. D. in Educational Leadership (Critical Pedagogy) from the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, MN. He currently lives in Surf City, NC and is the father of four children, three of whom are twice-exceptional.

 

THINGS YOU’LL LEARN FROM THIS EPISODE:

  • Dr. Postma’s personal story of growing up a 2e kid with very little support in a time when many neurodifferences weren’t recognized or understood
  • What “holistic development” means in the context of children, especially twice-exceptional children
  • Why Dr. Postma says social emotional development has to be one of the foundations for academic and intellectual potential
  • Where society is with regards to understanding asynchronous development
  • How schools can make small accommodations to make school more successful for 2e students
  • Why Dr. Postma wrote his book The Inconvenient Student and what he hopes it does in the world
  • Dr. Postma’s thoughts on how the educational system needs to be revamped
  • How SENG supports gifted and twice-exceptional students and their families
  • Why Dr. Postma says 2e people are among the most vulnerable populations

 

RESOURCES MENTIONED:

  • SENG (Supporting the Emotional Needs of the Gifted)

 

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