Have You Ever Wished Your Kid Would Just Grow Up Already? I Have…

The other day I was poking around on Pinterest and stumbled across a parenting quote that said simply, “Let them be little.” (I’ve since learned this is also the name of a 2004 song by American country music singer Billy Dean. Who knew?)

When Asher was younger, especially during those years when parenting him feltreally hard most of the time, I admit it—I wished he was older. I wanted time to speed up so I could get to a place where (I hoped) things would be easier . . . where time or maturity or all the therapy we were investing in would have paid off.

This past Sunday, the day I found this quote on Pinterest, was also the day I entrusted Asher for six hours to a ski instructor I didn’t know and who spoke very little English, bid Ash goodbye, and saw him hop onto a giant chair lift alone and head up a giant mountain in the Alps. As I stood there, shielding my eyes from the sun, and watched him get smaller and smaller until he disappeared in the distance,I had a moment.

As I stood there, shielding my eyes from the sun, and watched him get smaller and smaller until he disappeared in the distance,I had a moment.

Because now I’m in that place, the one where he’s older and easier and the therapy is finally paying off. Now when I think about how much I wanted those years to be over, I kind of wish I could go back and savor them just a little bit more, to live them rather than just trying to survive them.

It’s bittersweet, this business raising differently-wired kids. The challenges are many. The path is confusing. Their growth is uneven. And who they become is breathtaking.

Though Asher’s nearly a teen, I still get my cuddles in. He still instinctively reaches for my hand when we cross the street. He’s still very much a kid. So I’m going to do my best to cherish every last moment. And to let him be little. Because he won’t be for long.

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